Category: Lectures

Silent Walk @KABK @MAPS

Silent Listening Walk The Hague is a very unusual urban landscape. I’ve always been intrigued by its discretion. So much is hidden from the public – there is a secretive aspect to this city of politics and walls and diplomats and nobility and discrete wealth. Let’s take a walk together through the centrum, and listen to the city, as if it were a musical composition – it’s a great way to discover more than meets the eye. This ‘silent walk’

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Lecture @ NYU February 20th, 2021

Silence revisited: framing and re-framing John Cage’s 4’33” on YouTube Just as John Cage was influenced by diverse and non-musical sources from Zen to Thoreau so did his creation of the silence piece (4’33”) have effects far beyond the world of classical music. Amateurs, pranksters, death-metal bands, architects, and students have embraced it, each finding their own meaning. Hundreds of these versions are available on YouTube, and have been a rich source in my recent research. As part of my artistic practice,

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NEC Piano Department Lecture

NEC lecture notes from Guy Livingston, created for a lecture at the New England Conservatory. But these links are useful for all young pianists looking for new romantic repertoire…enjoy! LINKS: Gershwin Songbooks (arr for solo piano): Vanessa Lann – toy piano music: Lann – entranced by the beckoning light: Lann – Leaps of Faith: Bolcom – Serpent’s Kiss: Frederic Mompou: Prokofiev -Romeo and Juliet “Pern” by Yann Tiersen https://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtd.asp?ppn=MN0108589&utm_source=Musicnotes%20Now&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=10-Breathtakingly-Beautiful-Piano-Pieces-mdash-Musicnotes-Now Cloud Atlas by Mark Fowler: https://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtd.asp?ppn=MN0177739&utm_source=Musicnotes%20Now&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=10-Breathtakingly-Beautiful-Piano-Pieces-mdash-Musicnotes-Now “One Summer’s Day” by Joe

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Paris 1920s

Paris is a moveable feast Ernest Hemingway It is hard not to be intrigued by the period between the two wars, in which Paris flourished, and artists thrived. Montparnasse became legendary for its café life, as expats and locals fought their fights, argued over cubism, fashion, and politics, and lived their love affairs dramatically in the public eye. Key american figures were Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and George Antheil. From the French side, Kiki of Montparnasse, Erik Satie, and Jean

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